CHOLINE


http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=50
broccoli

 
 
Women 425 mg
 
 
What is choline?Choline is not generally considered a vitamin, but it is an essential micronutrient. While there is not yet an official Daily Value (recommendations aimed at avoid deficiency states), Adequate Intake (AI) levels for choline were established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. Although the human body is capable of synthesizing choline, it is mostly obtained through diet, including consumption of liver, eggs, breast milk and other choline-rich foods. Choline is vital for healthy liver function and normal brain development.
Why is it necessary?
Choline is utilized by the body in a variety of ways including aiding nerve signaling, maintenance of cell membranes, transporting triglycerides from the liver, and as a constituent of nervous system tissues in early brain development. Choline is also a precursor of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter vital to nerve and muscle function, and a component of lecithin, which is critical to normal liver metabolism. Without adequate dietary intake of choline, there is a higher-than-normal risk of chronic liver damage and eventual liver failure. Choline is vital in forming very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in the liver, which helps transport fat from that organ to cells throughout the body. Although VLDL is considered a "bad" form of cholesterol because high levels indicate an abundance of circulating triglycerides, if VLDL levels fall too low, fat will begin to accumulate in the liver.
What are the signs of a deficiency?
There is a higher likelihood of choline deficiency in people with a condition known as fatty liver. In rats, dietary choline deficiency has been associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Because it is a component of cell membranes and neurotransmitters, and used in nerve signaling, Choline may also play a role in memory; conversely, memory loss and dementia may indicate choline deficiency, though more research is needed to confirm the association.
How much, and what kind, does an adult need?
The National Academy of Sciences established an Adequate Intake level of:
  • men, 550 mcg
  • women, 425 mcg
  • pregnant females of any age, 450 mg
  • lactating females of any age, 550 mg
There is no official Daily Value recommendation, but Dr. Weil suggests a minimum daily intake of 550 mg.
How much does a child need?
The National Academy of Sciences established Adequate Intake levels as follows:
  • infants 0-6 months, 125 mg
  • babies 6-12 months, 150 mg
  • toddlers 1-3 years, 200 mg
  • children 4-8 years, 250 mg
  • young males 9-13 years, 375 mg
  • young females 9-13 years, 375 mg
  • teen and adult males 14 years and older, 550 mg
  • teen females 14-18 years, 400 mg
Dr. Weil agrees that these recommendations represent prudent minimum dosages.
 
How do you get enough from foods?
Most choline is present in the form of phosphatidycholine - a type of fat that incorporates choline as a major structural component.
 
It is found in abundance in egg yolks, beef liver, wheat germ, beef, soy foods, Brussels sprouts, cod, salmon, broccoli, peanut butter and milk chocolate.
 
It is important to include choline containing foods in your diet, especially if you do not eat whole eggs regularly.
Are there any risks associated with too much?
Excessive amounts of choline can cause low blood pressure, vomiting and
diarrhea. Very high doses - in excess of 10 grams per day - are associated with a buildup of trimethylamine, a metabolic byproduct of choline, resulting in a fishy odor given off by the skin.
Are there any other special considerations?
  • It is vital to include breast milk in a newborn's diet as it is a primary source of choline for babies.
  • Vegetarians and vegans should pay close attention to their choline intake and include soy and other choline-rich foods in their diets in lieu of eggs and beef liver.

. Eggs

What is choline?Choline is not generally considered a vitamin, but it is an essential micronutrient. While there is not yet an official Daily Value (recommendations aimed at avoid deficiency states), Adequate Intake (AI) levels for choline were established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. Although the human body is capable of synthesizing choline, it is mostly obtained through diet, including consumption of liver, eggs, breast milk and other choline-rich foods. Choline is vital for healthy liver function and normal brain development.
Why is it necessary?
Choline is utilized by the body in a variety of ways including aiding nerve signaling, maintenance of cell membranes, transporting triglycerides from the liver, and as a constituent of nervous system tissues in early brain development. Choline is also a precursor of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter vital to nerve and muscle function, and a component of lecithin, which is critical to normal liver metabolism. Without adequate dietary intake of choline, there is a higher-than-normal risk of chronic liver damage and eventual liver failure. Choline is vital in forming very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in the liver, which helps transport fat from that organ to cells throughout the body. Although VLDL is considered a "bad" form of cholesterol because high levels indicate an abundance of circulating triglycerides, if VLDL levels fall too low, fat will begin to accumulate in the liver.
What are the signs of a deficiency?
There is a higher likelihood of choline deficiency in people with a condition known as fatty liver. In rats, dietary choline deficiency has been associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Because it is a component of cell membranes and neurotransmitters, and used in nerve signaling, Choline may also play a role in memory; conversely, memory loss and dementia may indicate choline deficiency, though more research is needed to confirm the association.
How much, and what kind, does an adult need?
The National Academy of Sciences established an Adequate Intake level of:
  • men, 550 mcg
  • women, 425 mcg
  • pregnant females of any age, 450 mg
  • lactating females of any age, 550 mg
There is no official Daily Value recommendation, but Dr. Weil suggests a minimum daily intake of 550 mg.
How much does a child need?
The National Academy of Sciences established Adequate Intake levels as follows:
  • infants 0-6 months, 125 mg
  • babies 6-12 months, 150 mg
  • toddlers 1-3 years, 200 mg
  • children 4-8 years, 250 mg
  • young males 9-13 years, 375 mg
  • young females 9-13 years, 375 mg
  • teen and adult males 14 years and older, 550 mg
  • teen females 14-18 years, 400 mg
Dr. Weil agrees that these recommendations represent prudent minimum dosages.
 
How do you get enough from foods?
Most choline is present in the form of phosphatidycholine - a type of fat that incorporates choline as a major structural component.
 
It is found in abundance in egg yolks, beef liver, wheat germ, beef, soy foods, Brussels sprouts, cod, salmon, broccoli, peanut butter and milk chocolate.
 
It is important to include choline containing foods in your diet, especially if you do not eat whole eggs regularly.
Are there any risks associated with too much?
Excessive amounts of choline can cause low blood pressure, vomiting and
diarrhea. Very high doses - in excess of 10 grams per day - are associated with a buildup of trimethylamine, a metabolic byproduct of choline, resulting in a fishy odor given off by the skin.
Are there any other special considerations?
  • It is vital to include breast milk in a newborn's diet as it is a primary source of choline for babies.
  • Vegetarians and vegans should pay close attention to their choline intake and include soy and other choline-rich foods in their diets in lieu of eggs and beef liver.

. Eggs

Eating eggs regularly can help improve your memory. Eggs are one of the best sources of choline, which is an important nutrient used to produce acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in memory.

broccoli

http://www.drperlmutter.com/eat/brain-maker-foods/

Beets | Spinach | Alkaline food

0104419000792504
http://liveenergized.com/alkaline-diet-tips/health-benefits-of-liquid-chlorophyll/
spinach

Spinach is an alkaline powerhouse that you’re probably already very familiar with and it doesn’t matter what form you eat it in, you’ll be helping your body go alkaline. Buy baby spinach and use it as a base for a salad.
Top stats (per cup):
Vitamin C – 14%
Vitamin A – 56%
Iron – 4%
High Alkaline

wheatgrass

Wheatgrass is a very strong source of alkalinity for the body, use a daily glass of wheatgrass juice to get enough alkaline forming food.
Top stats (per 3g):
Iron – 44%
Vitamin A – 30%
Vitamin C – 12%


http://bembu.com/alkaline-foods

 


http://liveenergized.com/alkaline-diet-guides/the-7-most-alkaline-foods/

http://bembu.com/alkaline-foods


Almonds, Avocado, Banana-Yellow, Bean Fresh, Beet, Blackberries, Carrot, Chives, Cranberries, Endive, Grapes Sour, Kale, Peach dried, Persimmon, Pomegranate, Plum, Raspberries, Spinach.

Neutral Oils
Cold Pressed, Expeller Pressed, Almond, Avocado, Coconut, Canola, Cottonseed, Linseed, Olive, Safflower, Sesame, Soy, Sunflower, Walnut.

Alkaline
Agar, Alfalfa, Apple & Fresh Apple Cider, Apricot fresh, Artichokes globe, Bamboo shoots, Bean snap, Beans sprouted, Berries most, Blueberries, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cantaloupe, Cauliflower, Celery, Cherries, Chestnuts, Chicory, Coconut Milk, Collards, Corn fresh and sweet, Cucumbers, Daikon, Eggplant, Escarole, Garlic, Ginger root, Gooseberry, Grapefruit, Guava, Horseradish fresh and raw, Kelp, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lemon and Peel, Lettuce, Lime, Loganberry, Mango, Melons, Milk raw, Acidophilus Yogurt, Whey.



http://www.happyherbalist.com/alkaline_acid_balance.htm


http://www.alkalizingforlife.com/page/page/5128908.htm


http://bembu.com/alkaline-foods

http://www.acidalkalinediet.com/alkaline-foods/the-best-alkaline-forming-foods#.VsAFNzbSkhk

http://liveenergized.com/alkaline-diet-guides/the-7-most-alkaline-foods/

Zinc | Dark Chocolate

                
                      




Description:


As an essential trace mineral, Zinc is second to Iron as the most plentiful trace element in the body. It is needed for a number of enzymatic functions in the body, as well as for immune function, prostate health, antioxidant production and more. Now's 25mg Zinc formula uses a unique picolinate form, which is believed by many health professionals to be better absorbed and utilized by the human body.

  • Optimal 25mg dosage.
  • Picolinate form for better absorption.
  • Supports immune system health
  • Important for antioxidant protection.
  • Easy to swallow capsule.
One of the first signs of zinc deficiency can be altered taste and smell.  Zinc regulates the activity of insulin, for blood sugar control, thyroid hormone, for metabolism and the digestion of sugar and protein.  Natural health practitioners use zinc for a variety of health concerns including; acne, benign prostatic hyperplasia, colds, flus, diabetes, diaper rash, stomach ulcers, macular degeneration, impotence, osteoporosis, eczema and wound healing.

Zinc levels are decreased by diarrhea, kidney disease, liver disease, alcoholism and diabetes.  Zinc is not absorbed when it is consumed with fibre, phytates (found in grains and legumes), hard water, calcium, copper and iron.  Zinc is lost through perspiration so supplementation may be helpful for athletes, those who live in hot climates and those who regularly use saunas or steam rooms.  Zinc is depleted by the following medications: oral contraceptives, some diuretics, ulcer medications, antiviral medication and some antibiotics.  Much of our food is deficient in zinc due to poor soil levels of the mineral.  Food processing techniques destroy zinc.


dark chocolate and zinc
17. Dark Chocolate
As if you needed any additional reasons to eat chocolate, here’s one more. You’re getting quite a bit of Zinc in chocolate, but of course it’s also pretty high in calories so you don’t want to overdo it. There are antioxidants in dark chocolate that you don’t get with milk chocolate, and you end up avoiding a lot of the sugar and added fat if you stick to dark chocolate. Serving Size (100 grams), Zinc (9.6 milligrams), 546 calories.


http://bembu.com/foods-high-in-zinc

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=115

Anemia | Beets ..... B12 Methylcobalamin

Methylcobalamin
http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/whats-absorbable-form-b12/


Vitamin B12 does more than build red blood cells and prevent anemia. It is needed for healthy functioning of the brain and nerves, and helps the body metabolize fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.

Treating Anemia With Beet Juice


Beat anemia with beetrootAnemia, caused due to lack of iron in the blood, is a common problem these days. If you have been recently diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, here’s the best natural remedy for your problem – beetroot.

Beetroot is a valuable source of iron. About one cup of sliced beetroot will give you 1.1 mg of iron, fulfilling 6% of your daily recommend intake of iron. Iron is an essential nutrient required for the formation of hemoglobin, a protein present in red blood cells (RBCs) that is responsible for transporting oxygen to various parts of your body. Here are 10 more amazing benefits of beetroot.
http://www.thebestofrawfood.com/benefits-of-beet-juice.html


Treating Anemia With Beet Juice
Beetroot juice is the best natural remedy for anemia. It contains excellent cleansing properties with a high iron content that restores red blood cells whilst supplying oxygen and increasing the blood count.
As a valuable source of iron and beets are an excellent natural source to reverse anemia.
This liver detox juice is made of beetroots, apples, carrots, celery and ginger. The pectin in apples is good for digestion and helps to break down toxins. Carrots have a role in protecting the liver from harmful radicals. Celery strengthens the liver. Ginger helps the liver function better. All those together with the benefits beets have on liver detoxification make a great tasting and effective liver cleanse juice.




It is recommended that you drink one pint daily of blended beet juice. The base blend should be with carrot juice but you can add apples, pineapple, coconut flesh, spinach or cucumber depending on what other ailments you want to cure.

Vegetarians and vegans can also receive too little vitamin B12 since the main dietary sources of B12 are meat and cheese. In addition, recent studies show that B12 deficiency is common even among young people who eat meat. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause neurological decline even before symptoms of anemia appear. It can also cause elevated homocysteine levels, which increase the risk for heart disease.

Webber Naturals Vitamin B12 is easily absorbed under the tongue, thus bypassing the stomach and providing vitamin B12 directly into the bloodstream.

Our recommended daily intake level for B12 is 2.4 micrograms, and one serving of any of the following WHFoods will provide you with 100% or more of this amount: sardines, salmon, tuna, cod, lamb, or scallops. You'll get over 50% with a single serving of beef or shrimp, about one-third of the daily amount from one cup of yogurt, and between 10-25% from one serving of cheese, chicken, turkey, eggs, or cow's milk.




Dissolve 1 tablet under the tongue daily



         



The level of folic acid , another B vitamin, will be checked too.

How is it treated?

Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is treated with supplements of vitamin B12. Taking supplements brings your level of vitamin B12 back to normal, so you do not have symptoms. To keep your level of vitamin B12 normal, you will probably need to take supplements for the rest of your life. If you stop taking them, you'll get anemia again.
 
 

B12 deficiency anemia be prevented?

Most people can prevent this anemia by including animal products like milk, cheese, and eggs in their diets. People who follow a vegan diet can prevent it by taking a daily vitamin pill or by eating foods that have been fortified with B12.
 
 
 

Beets .... Betaine ...... balance pH levels ..... lemon

 

http://draxe.com/beet-benefits/
 
http://bembu.com/healthiest-foods
 
 
http://draxe.com/what-is-betaine/#

 Anti-Aging Properties

Eating
beets is one of the best days to cleanse the digestive tract and blood of built-up contaminants due to a diet and lifestyle that leads to high inflammation. Detoxification in this way combined with the high antioxidant values found in beets is an effective way to help naturally slow aging.
Beets are a great way to help balance pH levels and to alkalize the body as well. The pH scale is used to determine acidity versus alkalinity, with 7.1 to 14 being alkaline and 7 being neutral. Most diseases live in an acidic environment, so your body’s goal is to be slightly alkaline- and many whole foods like fruits and vegetables help to achieve this.
Limiting consumption of low-quality, processed acid-forming foods and eating more alkaline-forming foods like beets and other root vegetables can protect your body from diseases that occur more commonly in people as they age. This is due to their ability to decrease inflammation. Beets are also a great source of fiber, which helps the digestive system to properly function and even supports weight loss, another key area that can be struggle as you get older.

Grains

Eating foods made with whole wheat can help you get more betaine in your diet, since both wheat germ and wheat bran are among the better sources of betaine. Wheat germ contains 1,241 milligrams per 100-gram serving, and wheat bran contains 1,339 milligrams. Snack on pretzels, which provide 237 milligrams per 100 grams, and make your sandwiches with whole-wheat bread, which contains 201 milligrams per 100 grams. Dry spaghetti, all-purpose flour and cheese crackers are also good sources of betaine.

Vegetables

When it comes to vegetables, spinach is your best bet for increasing your betaine levels, since it is particularly high in this nutrient, with 645 milligrams per 100 grams. Beets are another good way to get your betaine, since they contain 297 milligrams per 100-gram serving. Try a side of spinach sauteed with garlic and olive oil, add grated or cooked beets to your salads or start your meal off with borscht, a Russian beet soup.

Animal Products

If you aren't a fan of whole grains or greens, try eating more shrimp. It contains more betaine than most other animal-based foods with about 218 milligrams per 100-gram serving. Other types of seafood are also good sources of betaine. Start your meal with a spinach salad with seared scallops, make your main dish a shrimp-and-broccoli stir-fry or cook up a seafood stew for a delicious meal high in betaine. Although meat and poultry aren't particularly good sources of betaine, many Americans get a lot of their betaine from these foods because they eat so much of them, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Considerations

You don't necessarily have to eat betaine-rich foods to increase your betaine levels, because choline is a precursor to betaine. Eating foods high in choline, like chicken or beef liver, eggs, pork or soybeans, can also improve your betaine levels. Check with your doctor before taking betaine supplements, because these can cause side effects, including diarrhea and nausea and may raise your cholesterol levels. However, you don't have to worry about getting too much betaine from foods.
And after drinking all the lemon water and eating the beets, you’ll be well on your way to a healthy digestive experience, and loaded up with a helpful tip to share at your next cocktail potty, er, party.

Betaine can be found in both plant and animal foods.
Betaine can be found in both plant and animal foods.

If you've ever cooked beets and gotten your hands stained red, you have experience with betaine, since this nutrient gives beets their red color. However, you can also get betaine from a variety of other foods. Eating more of these foods may help keep you healthy, since betaine can make you less likely to get clogged arteries. It may also lower your inflammation levels.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/291527-food-sources-of-betaine/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/291527-food-sources-of-betaine/

Beets

Food Sources of Betaine
Fresh beets

The USDA recognizes beets as a source of betaine, stating that it has been shown to provide anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and detox support in the body. The betaine is concentrated in the peel and the flesh of the beets making this food a good addition to the diet. Beets can be boiled and added to salads along with fresh vegetables and walnuts for a healthy and nutrient-rich meal.

 
 
Beets
A few beets on a salad like the one above (red beets, orange, chives and pecans)


 
TORONTO –  love the “beet test.”
All you need is about half of a raw beet, and the stomach to glance into your toilet after a successful bowel movement sometime in the near future—hopefully between 12 and 24 hours after you chow down on that beet.



Story continues below



        Holistic nutritionist Joy McCarthy said it’s a simple way to “check your transit time.”

“What I mean by that is when you eat a food, how long does it actually take to come out the other end?” explained McCarthy. “This is a good indication of how your food is being processed and if you’re constipated.”



 Colour of urine can tell a lot about your overall health
McCarthy said even though a lot of people are “regular,” they’re not eliminating effectively. The beet test allows you to get a sense of whether you fall into that ideal 12-24 hour range, since you’ll be able to see the bright red pigment in your stools.
Fiery red poop 24 hours or more later means you’ve got a “slow transit time,” also known as constipation—a common result of the beet test.
“That food is sitting in your gut for that many days,” said McCarthy, who suggested increasing the fibre in your diet as one solution. Eating chia or flax seeds, more vegetables, pears or berries can combat constipation, but don’t overdo it if you’re not used to it.
Berries
“If you’re not someone who eats fibre, then you want to increase these fibrous-rich foods slowly because it can also have the opposite effect,” she said.
Drinking water is another key method to improve your digestion.
“A lot of people have the slow transit time because they’re just not consuming enough water. Their intestines just get very dehydrated and food just doesn’t move through effectively.”

Six gut-friendly finds from CHFA East
Less common is if you’re seeing those beets in less than 12 hours. McCarthy said that means you’re not really absorbing all the nutrients from your food. You might be eating too fast and not fully chewing your meals, which will leave you with food particles in your stools.
Or you could have too many stimulants in your daily life, like coffee.
“You have less absorption of nutrients when you consume stimulants because they basically force food through the gut much faster,” she said.
So take your raw or roasted beets—peeled or unpeeled—and eat them as you wish: in bites or grated as a salad topping (for more on the beet method and a beet recipe, check out McCarthy’s book here).
McCarthy warns against using pickled beets from a jar since boiled, over-processed beets don’t have the rich red pigment that will stand out in your lavatory.
Another helpful at-home strategy to promote digestive health is lemon and water first thing in the morning on an empty stomach. It won’t do anything weird to your body waste, but McCarthy said it’ll give you a better quality bowel movement. (A BQBM, if you will).
GBCLEMONWATER
“Lemon helps stimulate the liver’s detoxifying enzymes. And it really helps to stimulate you to have a good bowel movement, because the lemon actually stimulates your gallbladder to produce bile, and bile—along with fibre—is a carrier of toxins.”
McCarthy said she recommends this for clients who have heartburn.
“You think that heartburn is excess acid, but 90 per cent of people who have heartburn actually don’t produce enough acid,” she said. “They’re digesting by fermentation, which as a byproduct causes gaseous substances to push up through the esophagus and cause pain. So lemon and water is really helpful for preventing that.”
Use a quarter to a half of a freshly squeezed lemon in a cup of room temperature water, and drink it on an empty stomach first thing in the morning—for maximal absorption.
And after drinking all the lemon water and eating the beets, you’ll be well on your way to a healthy digestive experience, and loaded up with a helpful tip to share at your next cocktail potty, er, party.